December 1941 PDF Print
Tuesday, 10 January 2012 16:05

DECEMBER 4, 1941

 

The first spelling bee and oratorical contest for the county was held at Austin-Tracy last Friday. Ollie Bell Bunch, 13, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bunch and 7th grade pupil of Lucas, James Trigg Pace, teacher, won the oratorical contest with the subject “Are the People of America Still Patriotic.”  She was awarded $5.00 by Attorney Richard L. Garnett.  In the Spelling Bee, Carolyn Morris, 15 years old, daughter of Mr. Jewell Morris, and pupil of Finney school, won first and was awarded $1.00 by the County Board of Education.

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The host of friends and acquaintances of Mr. and Mrs. S. S..Rigsby will regret to hear of the misfortune which struck them last Friday night when they lost their home and its contents by fire.  The fire was believed to have been caused by a faulty chimney and had gained such headway that the roof was falling into the second floor when they were awakened by the falling timbers.  Mr. and Mrs. Rigsby escaped with only their clothing and had no opportunity to save any furniture or other possessions, which included some valuable antiques.

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In the Edmund Rogers Chapter D.A..R, held on December 3, Mrs. W. H. Honeycutt, Chairman of the Good Citizenship Pilgrimage, reported that the students of Glasgow High School, had selected Ruth Bridges, Alyce Chamberlain, and Ruby Nell Colter as the outstanding students of the school.  The faculty will select one of these students to attend the State Conference D.A.R to be held in Ashland in March.  At Ashland the outstanding student of Kentucky will make the pilgrimage to the National Congress D.A.R. to be held in April.

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Mrs. Frances Harlin fell from the door of her home at Fountain Run Sunday and fractured her hip for the second time, the first time being 25 years ago when she fell on the hardwood floor.  She is 83 years old and is the step-mother of the late John H. Harlin of this city.

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Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hall and Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Redman were in Nashville last Sunday to see Mr. and Mrs. W.C. Potts, but the main attraction was little Charles William Potts, who greeted them lustily.

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AD.  Included in a Kroger ad was Old Kentucky Home Sorghum on sale, with a 2-1/2 pound jar going for 27 cents; 5-pound jar, 50 cents; and 10 pounds for 93 cents.

A sorghum spice cake, 14-ounce size was only 17 cents.

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AD.  Young’s Direct Stores, located in old A&P corner location.  Men’s work shoes, values to $2.50 now on sale for $1.49; men’s Washington Dee-Cee pants, values to $5.00, now at extra-special price of $1.10.  mole skin pants, valued from $1.98 to $2.50, now $1.69.

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DECEMBER 11, 1941

Electric Substation North of Town Is Placed Under Protection of Militia.  Following advice from Washington today, a request has been filed with Judge Frank W. Jones to assign members of the local militia to guard the electric sub-station located about six miles north of town on the Jackson Highway.  Two militiamen were assigned to duty tonight, and announcement was made that, for the present, guards would be assigned on a 24-hour basis.  Guards have also been placed by the L&N Railroad Company to guard the tunnel north of Park City, and reports have it that some men at Munfordville have been employed to guard the L&N bridge over Green River.

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Many uneasy moments were spent by many Barren Countians following the attack on Honolulu, Pearl Harbor, Hickam Field and other points in and around our Hawaiian base, as well as those in the Philippines, but as yet no relatives have been advised of the killing or wounding of Barren Countians despite the fact that our boys are in service at practically every point under attack.

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“Riders of the Purple Sage” at Trigg Theatre, December 14-15.  Zane Grey’s most exciting story, has been made into an even more exciting motion picture.  Set in the open country of Arizona in the days when the man who could draw his six-gun fastest was the law, this story follows the adventures of a mysterious stranger, played by George Montgomery, who has come to stop the nefarious activities of the local lawmen.

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NOTICE.  I have taken over the Eight Ball Pool Room formerly operated by Mr. Malcolm Smith and I invite all my friends to drop around and see me.  Respectfully, Will H. Page.

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A letter from Bryant Edmunds of Tulsa, Oklahoma, written to his brother Chase Edmunds , revealed some interesting facts in connection with Kentucky’s early statehood, including the opening of a “Tobacco Road” from Barren County to

New Orleans by their grandfather, the distinguished Capt. William Edmunds.

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DECEMBER 18, 1941

Cave City Is County’s First Victim of War.  Frank William Kroulik, 26, a son of

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Kroulik of Cave City, was the first victim to be reported from the attack on Honolulu on December 7th.  Mr. Kroulik is manager of the Gardner Hotel, Cave City, where he has resided for a little more than a year, having moved here from Nashville.  The telegram received from the Navy Department stated that the young man had been killed in action during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

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Two more dams, Dale Hollow and Center Hill, are authorized in appropriations made last week by Congress, for construction on tributaries to the Cumberland River.  It is reported that completion of the dams is contemplated within eight months from letting of contract.  Both are power projects, with a combined output of 130,000 kilowatts.

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The Boy Scouts made a record haul on old papers, magazines and paper boxes last Saturday when they collected two and a half truck loads.  Another article has been added to the list for collection, and that is old tires.  Housekeepers are asked to have what they wish collected, at a convenient place for the Scouts, so that no time will be wasted.

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From Metcalfe County.  The winner on the annual spelling bee held Saturday was Arlene Morgan, 13 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Morgan of Summer

Shade, from West Point School.  Second place was won by Arlene Matney, 12 year old daughter of Mrs. Virgie Matney from Stoney Point School.  There were a total of 13 participants.

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Sgt. George H. Baker sailed December 13th for parts unknown.  He is a leader of the 2nd platoon of Company H, 34th Infantry.  He is the first to leave from Glasgow.

He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. B.C. Baker.

DECEMBER 25, 1941

 

Frank J. Kroulik, manager of the Gardner Hotel at Cave City, has been advised by the Navy Department that his son, Frank W., who was reported as killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor, has been located at a navy hospital in the Philippines, where he is seriously injured.

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As a fitting climax to the social events of the week, the wedding of Miss Louise Smith and Mr. Norris Jolly will take place Saturday evening at 8:30 at the First Christian Church.  A small party will be given for the wedding party Friday evening following rehearsal at the Smith home on West Cherry.

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Winn School Wins Flag.  D. J. Niemeier, Commander of Barren County Post, American Legion, is arranging for a program at Winn School for presentation of a large American flag in recognition of their winning of this award for turning in the largest amount of aluminum per pupil during the recent drive conducted in this county.

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More than 93 years of active and constructive life was ended Saturday night when the angel of death brought an end to the earthly life of Washington Alexander Huggins. Wash Huggins was born in Glasgow on March 18, 1848 and was a son of the late Zion and Betty Everett Huggins.  Educated in local schools, he devoted his entire lifetime to the advancement and betterment of cultural and agricultural conditions in Barren County.  In recent years he has been outstanding in his encouragement of 4-H, Utopia, Homemakers and Conservation organizations.  He was one of Kentucky’s oldest and staunchest Republicans, and was perhaps the oldest active leader in the state at the time of his death.  Wash Huggins may be gone, but his record will mark many proud pages on Barren County’s history.

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Miss Mildred Speck, daughter of County Road Engineer and Mrs. Clark Speck, is being featured in the Louisville Courier-Journal in an article entitled “A Ken- tuckian’s Day in Washington.”   This article will photographically follow Miss Speck in an hourly portrayal of her very responsible position with the Office of Productive Management (OPM).

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