March 1932 PDF Print
Tuesday, 03 April 2012 19:12

MARCH 3, 1932

A number of local merchants will leave for Frankfort this morning where they will be joined by delegations from over the State to protest passage of the Gross Sales Tax Law.  Mr. Roy Grinstead received a telegram from the Kentucky Merchants Association urging that all retail stores in the State close at noon on Tuesday so that a large delegation could attend this meeting.

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Mr. Stanley Hall happened to an accident in an unusual way last week  while driving a coupe down grade on Columbia Avenue with two police dogs on the seat beside him.  The dogs had heretofore been friendly but, for some reason, they started fighting.  In trying to separate the dogs, Mr. Hall lost sight that he was driving a car, which ran off the street and crashed into a telephone pole.  The impact threw the larger dog through the windshield and, upon regaining its footing, the dog ran a considerable distance and was not found for several hours.  The car was wrecked beyond repair but, fortunately, Mr. Hall escaped serious injury.

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Friends are congratulating Mr. Rollin Yates on his promotion to Junior Engineer in the Highway Department.  Mr. Yates has been connected with the Highway Department for several years and his gradual rise to his present position indicates his ability and thoroughness in his work.

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Some thieves broke into the store of Mr. J. D. Smith on the Burkesville Road Monday night and took off with everything they could carry, even to Mr. Smith’s winter overcoat which he had left hanging in the store.  Well, spring has come, and he won’t particularly need the coat until next fall, but the stock of goods was for present use.

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The quilting party given by Mrs. Sherman Ferguson last week for the Benefit of the Baptist Orphans Home at Glendale, Kentucky was attended by a large number of ladies who all seemed to enjoy their get-together, besides quilting two quilts.

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Owing to inactivity and surplus help, Mr. Grover Britt has been temporarily let out of the Sheriff’s office; however, he is still commissioned as a Deputy Sheriff and can make arrests and transact any business as heretofore.  He has made a good and fearless deputy, and his friends regret that this step was necessary.

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Mrs. Lorenzo Carver, Mrs. Mable Dulin, and Mr. J. F. Carver of Glasgow were winners in an old-time fiddlers contest in Smiths Grove last Saturday night,  Mr. Lorenzo C. and Mrs. Dulen as fiddlers and Mr. J. F. Carver as banjo player, need no introduction to Barren and adjoining counties.

 

MARCH 10, 1932

 

Next Sunday we are to have our last Sunday train.  Beginning Monday and from then on, the 5:50 train, known as the early train, will be discontinued, and we will have only two trains each way on week days, with no train on Sunday.  The early mail, arriving around 7:00 will be brought from either Glasgow Junction or Cave City, so we will not be injured as far as mail is concerned.

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Boys from the classes of Mrs. Rapp and Mrs. Trigg will give a recital at the High School Auditorium on March 15.  Cowboys, Indians, Soldiers, and even a Russian Prince will be there playing characteristic music.  Everyone is invited.

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In a decade the price of gasoline has been cut in half, disregarding the tax.  But rising tax rates have taken much of the benefit away from the motorist.  In 1920 the average price of gasoline was about 30 cents per gallon and the state tax was less than one cent per gallon.  At the beginning of 1932, the average price per gallon of gasoline was only 13 cents, but the tax rate average was four cents, with 30% going  to the State.  The present “high rise of gasoline,” therefore, must be blamed, not on the oil industry which has made consistent progress in improving motor fuel, but on exorbitant gas taxes.

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The Woman’s Auxiliary of the Samson Community Hospital is launching a membership drive.  Membership rate for joining the Auxiliary will be $1.00 per year, and the proceeds will be used to replenish the linens fund at the hospital.  The ladies are attempting to secure a membership of 500 and will be glad to enroll any lady from Barren and adjoining counties, or any lady previously living here who has left the state.

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Mrs. Lee Button died at her home in Game last Wednesday at the age of 60.  Before her marriage, she was Miss Lou Brunson of Missouri.  Her husband, Squire Button, died about twelve years ago, and she leaves three daughters and three sons:  Mrs. Ross Settles of this place, Mrs. John Mutter and Mrs. Herbert Young of Finney, Messrs. Clyde, Elbert, and Robert Button, all at home.  She was a member of the Beaver Creek Baptist Church and was a much beloved lady.  Funeral services were held by Rev. J. A. Gaines, and burial was in the Page Cemetery.

MARCH 17, 1932

 

After a long illness, Mr. Bernard Landrum has died at the home of his mother, Mrs. Maggie Landrum. He is survived by his wife, the former Louemma Goode, and two daughters, Joyce and Bernadean.  He also leaves one brother, Mr. J. R. Landrum, and one sister, Mrs. Opal Page of Illinois.

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Messrs. Gilbert Lee and E. Bradshaw, better known as “Red,” have rented a building on North Race Street and are having it converted into a garage.  Both men are well known here, and since their reputation as skilled mechanics is well established, their success seems assured.

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The commencement program for the first graduating class of the Austin High School will begin with the baccalaureate sermon at the Baptist Church on Sunday  evening, March 20, given by Rev. L. D. Robinson, pastor.  On Friday evening the commencement address will be given by Mr. Bryant, Superintendent of the Scottsville City Schools.

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From Bethel:

Well, folks, we all thought we were not going to have any snow this winter, but we sure got fooled.  Some folks think that oats, wheat, onions and some other plants have been considerably damaged by the extreme cold for this time of year, but we hope it is not as bad as that.  Many of the farmers are having a vacation on account of the bad weather, but the wives are very busy, as they are forced to become nurses to families having flu, and are also turning their homes into hospitals to take  take care of their baby chicks.

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A & P Food Stores:  Sugar, 25 lbs. $1.19; 8 O’Clock Coffee, 19 cents per pound; pink Alaskan salmon, 10 cents per can or 3 cans for 25 cents; Palmolive soap, 4 bars for 25 cents; lettuce, 4 cents per head; grapefruit, 4 fancy size, 3 for 10 cents.

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MARCH 24, 1932

 

Mrs. Matilda Allen, 80, wife of Mr. John Allen of Cross Roads, died at 8:00 Monday evening following a 3-day illness of pneumonia.  Mr. Allen, her husband,  who had been ill two weeks with pneumonia, died Tuesday morning at 10:00.  They were members of the Pleasant Hill Church and had lived consistent Christian lives, loved and respected by their neighbors and friends.  Double funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday afternoon and a double burial followed at the family cemetery.  Some people who knew the couple well said that the Allens had often expressed their desire to pass on at the same time.  Their sixty years of married life and companionship had so endeared them to each other, that both believed that to be alone would be unbearable.

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Seven Injured In Auto Wreck.  Miss Ruth Lee Hunt, who was seriously injured Wednesday evening in a wreck on South Green Street, was slightly improved today at the Community Hospital.  The car, driven by Rex England, contained six other high school pupils:  Tom Ford, Ruth Lee Hunt, William Kinslow, Clara Mae Witt, Mary Elizabeth Witt, and Lucinda Peden.  In passing a car, the England car went off the road, turning over three times. Every member of the party was injured, and it is a mystery as to how they escaped death since the top of the Chrysler was crushed down on the seats.  It is thought, however, that all of them are on the road to recovery.

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Horace McMurtrey, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. McMurtrey of Summer Shade, had the misfortune to break his leg Sunday afternoon at the funeral of Mr. Pat Kennedy.  The little fellows were playing around a tombstone, which loosened and fell on the little boy.  He was brought here Monday for treatment.

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Mule Day Monday.  Of course County Court Day in March is always mule day in Glasgow, as crops are soon to be set, and farms must be ready.  The only out-of-county buyer we know of was a Bowling Green buyer who  picked up seven mules.  We are told that many farmers bought mules for their own use, and that trade was very lively.

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From Mount Herman:  There will be an egg hunt at the S. F. Billingsleys on Easter Sunday.  Everybody is invited to come.   We guess there will be plenty of eggs, and one may eat all he finds if he chooses.  We are hoping that eggs and all other farm products will be higher next Easter, since it seems that things we have to buy and things we have to sell are not on an equal.

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