APRIL 1932 PDF Print
Thursday, 12 April 2012 14:34

 

APRIL 7, 1932

Mr. Holman Retires.  It is a matter of sincere regret that Mr. P. W. Holman thought it necessary to retire from the banking business, but close confinement to business for so many years was hard on his health.  When his health improves, we have no doubt that he will again be a most useful citizen, and we sincerely trust that he may.

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In the City Council meeting held Tuesday evening, several new ordinances were passed, including the condemnation of the Davis Hotel and the order to tear it away.  Also passed was an ordinance to prohibit “commercializing Sunday amusements,” including pool or billiard rooms, moving pictures, vaudeville and other amusements operated for compensation.  The penalty for violation was from $10 to $100.

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The trial of Captain A. E. Ely of this place, on an indictment charging him with fraud in connection with his handling of funds of the National Guard last year, was set to be held in Circuit Court in Frankfort Tuesday of this week.  Quite an array of witnesses, either material or character, was in attendance from Glasgow  to vouch for Capt. Ely.  Because there were so many delays in actually getting to the case, the Commonwealth Attorney asked that the case be dismissed, with leave to refer it back to the grand jury at a later date, and this was approved by the Judge.  No one expects another indictment to be brought, as it was the universal opinion that there was nothing to the charge.

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Mr. J. E. Cherry has sold the Glenview Roadhouse to Mr. H. W. Butzke of Springfield, Kentucky.  Mr. Butzke has already taken possession and will arrive Sunday.  Cherry retains the swimming pool and will open it at the beginning of the season.

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The home of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Young, near Freedom, was burned early Sunday morning.  The family was in the front room and when fire was discovered in the kitchen, there was barely any time for the family to escape with very few household effects.  Mrs. Gertie Fudge, sister of Mrs. Young, and her daughter Anna Mae have been making their home with Mr. and Mrs. Young, and Mrs. Fudge saved only her coat, not being able to even get her shoes.

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APRIL 14, 2012

From The Tompkinsville News.  A picturesque character who will be sadly missed in the Turkey Neck Bend section was Dr. T. H. Bedford, who died at his home at Coe on April 1.  He was buried the next day in the family burying ground.  Dr. Bedford had practiced medicine in this vicinity during his 83 years of life, riding to and fro on horseback.  Dr. Bedford’s survivors include his wife, two sons, and three daughters.  He was a member of the Church of Christ, and Bro. Winckler of that church in Nashville, spoke at the funeral service.

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Four Barren Countians will participate in a program to be given over Radio Station WHAS on Friday afternoon.  This program will be one of the features of the Kentucky Education Association and will be given by the orchestra of Western Kentucky Teachers College.  Charles Neville of Glasgow Junction and Miss Lena Brown Adams of Glasgow are members of the orchestra, which is recognized as one of the outstanding musical organizations of the South.  The orchestra is directed by Professor Franz J. Strahn, who has been head of the Music Department at Western for many years.  Misses Madeline Chaney of Glasgow and Ethel Whitlow of 88 will also appear on the program as they are members of the Western Glee Club which will intersperse the recital with several numbers.

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Accident That Proved Lucky for Malden Smith.   A team owned by Mr. Malden Smith of Bruce, and driven by Wood Ramsey, ran away on the South Jackson Highway Sunday morning and, while no serious damage was done to the team, wagon, or contents, the owner is still guessing how he came out so lucky.  The wagon was loaded with seven large, fat hogs and was followed by another wagon with about the same number of hogs, when the left front wheel ran off, dislodging the driver who, in falling, struck one of the horses.  This frightened the animals and caused the runaway.  When the team started, the bed of the wagon fell over and collided with a telephone pole near Pritchard’s Store.  The second team then took fright and ran off but was stopped without damage.  Ramsey received a badly bruised leg, but no damage was done to the wagon, hogs, or horses.

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From Summer Shade.  It’s a girl for the Clayton Nunnallys, a girl for Mr. and Mrs. Hershell Wells a girl at the Clarence Gentrys, and the stork also left a girl at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Cawthorn.  So many girls coming into our midst is a good indication that wars are at an end.

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APRIL 21, 1932

The First National Bank last week announced suspended payments  of 5% monthly, and this forced the Citizens National to the same rule as a protection to its depositors, else the frightened depositors would have made a run on the bank.  Then Friday, the First National failed to open its doors.  Mr. Philip Watson, who is presently closing up the affairs of the Trigg National Bank, has been appointed to close the First National also.  Much expense will be saved by dividing the closing expenses between these two banks,

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Dr. W. A. Weldon has contracted for the erection of a 16-room apartment house on the lot on College Street alongside the National Guard Armory.  Dr. Weldon already has an apartment building on the same lot and the new one, like the one already built, is to be a fine structure.  If others will follow the example of Dr. Weldon, Glasgow will grow by leaps and bounds.

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NOTICE.  Reduction in Price of Ice.  Kentucky Utilities Company lowers the price of ice, in keeping with other necessities of life.  See Truck Driver for coupon books.

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AD.  H. G. Hill Stores.  Picnic Hams, sugar cured, 10 cents per pound;  Head Lettuce, 2 for 15 cents;  Crackers, 2-pound carton, 20 cents; Mayonnaise or Relish,

pint jar, 15 cents;  Lifebuoy Soap, 3 bars, 20 cents.  It’s A Fact – You Always Do Better at Hill’s.

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APRIL 28, 1932

The local golfers are anticipating the official opening of the Country Club on May 12.  Constant work for the last month by Elder Brown, the groundskeeper, has placed the golf course back in shape.  In addition to the golf course, two tennis courts have been installed and a tennis league organized.  Golf was introduced here last year after an absence of fourteen years, and the “golf bugs” are just rarin’ to get started on this season’s campaign.

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From Poplar Grove.  Mr. and Mrs. Dexter Bacon of the Temple Hill country are the proud parents of a new baby girl.

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From The Tompkinsville News.  The farm home of Judge A. C. Pinckley, near Flippin, was destroyed by fire last Sunday.  The home was occupied by Stanley McPeak and family, and they succeeded in getting the greater part of their household goods out; however, a lot of household goods belonging to Judge Pinckley were burned.  The home was one of the nicest in the western part of Monroe County, and everyone will miss this landmark.

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Storm Does Much Damage.  An unusually severe rain and wind storm struck Barren and adjoining counties last Monday morning at 2:30 o’clock, doing considerable damage to buildings and timber.  Many houses were unroofed, some blown down, and barns and silos were destroyed by the wind and lightning.  Here in town, Mr. W. D. Dickinson lost a $50 plate glass in the front of his store; a window was blown out at the home of Rev. J. A. Gaines, and a tree was blown against the residence of Mr. L. B. Doyle.  We have no way of estimating the damage in dollars and cents, but, so far, we have not heard of any lives lost.

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From Elbow Springs.  Mr. Chester Jackson and two children of Tulsa, Oklahoma, who spent a few days with his mother, Mr. J. T. Jackson of Glasgow, has returned to his home, making the 900-mile trip in his Ford in twenty hours.

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Slick Rock High School Commencement Will Be May 7-14.  Programs have been scheduled as follows:  “Aaron Slick from Punkin’ Crick,” Saturday May 7, admission 10 cents and 20 cents;  baccalaureate sermon by Rev. Hulse, Sunday May 8; graduation exercises, Dr. Gordon Wilson giving the address, May 13; and “Baby Steps Out,” May 14, admission 15 cents and 25 cents.

 

 

 

 

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