MAY 1942 PDF Print
Monday, 04 June 2012 21:13

 

MAY 7, 1942

New Type Program at Temple Hill High School.  Twenty-seven seniors will receive diplomas at a most unusual and striking Commencement Exercise to be given by the Senior Class at Temple Hill High School.  The program, in which every Senior has a part, is presented in the form of a play entitled “Attic Memo-  ries.”  The setting is an attic in 1952, where the Seniors are found as portraits hanging on the wall.  They come from their frames and re-live their Commencement which is supposed to have taken place some years before. Valeria Barbour will give the valedictory address.

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Two more signs “Gone to the Army” can be theoretically hung on the doors of two more local attorneys following the acceptance of Philip H. Wilson, City Attorney, and John Basil Preston, both of whom volunteered for delivery of the contingency yesterday.  Wilson had previously been rejected but, not satisfied with the exam , insisted on another try – and it worked.  Mr. Preston has already closed his office and stored his equipment, but Mr. Wilson expects to return this weekend to store the library and equipment of the firm of Wilson and Wilson “for the duration.”

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More than 600,000 pounds of scrap metal were shipped from Barren County during the months of January, February, and March.  All farmers who have not already turned in scrap metal are requested to pile up their scrap iron and then notify the County Agent to have it picked up.  A small pen is being set up in the Courthouse yard, and all persons who have just a small amount of iron may deposit it in this pen.  So come on, folks, and Slap the Jap with Your Scrap.

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AD:  Remember Mother.  Hats off to her…America’s Sweetheart!  She’s the mainstay of the nation, the inspiration to children and to sons already grown who serve our nation in distant places.  She merits your tenderness, thoughtfulness and love every day…but this special day is yours to tell her by letter or in some small, tangible way that she is ever in your hearts.  Give her a fancy hankie, one with a lacy border, for only 25 cents; or a new purse, in many sizes and shapes to suit her fancy, 98 cents or $1.98; or a blouse, tailored or frilled, 98 cents or $1.98; even a lace tablecloth…they’re a mother’s pride and joy.  New ones always make her happy…$1.98 to $5.95.  Do your stuff for her on Mother’s Day.  National Stores Corporation.

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MAY 14, 1942

George J. Ellis Sr. Passes Suddenly Today.  The passing of George Ellis removes from Glasgow and Barren County one of its strongest and most influential citizens, and one whose passing will be felt in many varied activities of the community.  Until recent years when actively in charge of his popular Corner Drug Store, Mr. Ellis was prominent in many activities.  Perhaps first on his list was member of the Board of Deacons of the Glasgow Baptist Church.  Other activities included President of Citizens National Bank, President of the Board of Trustees of Samson Community Hospital, Director of Glasgow Railway Company, the Jacksonway Hotel, and many other local activities.  He entered the drug business about 44 years ago, for many years an associate with the late J.S. Leech and later became an associate with Dr. E. T. Ellison, at this corner, in the firm of Ellis and Ellison .  After  Dr. Ellison’s death, the firm became known as George J. Ellis Drug Company.  Associated with him in the Corner Drug Store is his son, J. Mitchell Ellis, who survives, as does the other son, Judge George J. Ellis Jr.  Only other survivors are his sister, Mrs. Howe Ralston and two grandchildren, George J. III and Martha Mitchell Ellis.  Though he will be missed, Glasgow is fortunate to have had his activity and influence for more than fifty years.

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Richard L. Garnett has been named as Acting City Attorney to serve during the interim while Mr. Cecil Wilson or his brother, Pvt. Philip Wilson, is in the Army.  The City Council directed that the job would revert to either of these two men upon their return.

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Ten colored registrants were delivered by the Local Board last Saturday morning.  While waiting for the bus to arrive, a large crowd gathered to see “the boys” off.  It was a jolly time for many, but not for two.  For these two, May 9th was breaking in a very bad way, evidenced by the reaction of Cleodis Curry (on the bus) and his brother Leodis, who was seeking a place behind a brick pillar on the Christian Church across the street. May 9th was the birthday of these twin brothers who had never previously been separated.  Uncle Sam was taking, Cleodis while Leodis would stay at home with his mother.  But the night found them reunited.  Cleodis was turned down at the termination station in Louisville and returned home on a late bus.  Their 24th birthday was belatedly celebrated on Sunday.

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The second class of the Samson Community Hospital Nurses Aides will receive their caps Friday evening, May 15th.  Presentation of caps will be made by Miss G. Davis, Registered Nurse. Short talks will be made by Rev. LeRoy Baker and Dr. C. C. Howard.  The class consists of Misses Anna Louise Buckner of Greensburg; Corrine Hill, Smiths Grove; Prentice Jenkins, Lafayette, Tennessee; Ada Mary Whitaker, Temple Hill; and Ruby Veluzat, Slick Rock.

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Mr. and Mrs. J. Wood Vance are moving into their new home, the Morrison log house on North Jackson, which they purchased last week.

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MAY 21, 1942

Glasgow’s newest ultra-modern mercantile establishment, Sullivan’s Department Store, on the old Morris Corner, opened its doors this morning and reflected the splendid transformation that had been completed in the five or six weeks of work by expert workmen.  Sullivan’s will be in charge of W. B. Gillenwater, who recently moved here from Tompkinsville and who is recognized as one of the finest merchants in this section.

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Foundations have been completed for remodeling and expansion of A. F.  Crow’s Funeral Home at Washington and Broadway.  Plans call for extensive improve- ments which will provide a larger chapel and re-arrangement of office and preparation rooms.  A porch will be added that will extend practically the entire width of the Washington Street side of the property.

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School Students Have No Social Security Numbers.  School students taking a job on farms during the vacation season are not required to have social security numbers, as agriculture is not covered under the Social Security Act.  Only persons employed in commerce or industry are required to have social security numbers.  Those persons on farms or in other domestic services are urged to refrain from applying for account numbers which they do not need.

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Mrs. J. T. Colter and daughter Ruby Nell, of Glasgow Route 4, will leave for Washington, D.C. Saturday morning.  Ruby Nell recently passed a Civil Service Examination and has accepted a position as Senior Typist in the Departmental Services in Washington and is to report to work Monday morning, May 25.  She is a 1942 graduate of Glasgow High School.

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Theatre Features Military Movies.  Showing at the Plaza Theatre on Friday and Saturday will be “True to the Army,” with Allen Jones and Judy Canova.  On Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, ”To the Shores of Tripoli” will feature John Payne, Randolph Scott and Maureen O’Hara.

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MAY 28, 1942

William Howard (Billy) Bryant and Lewis Dickinson received their M.D. degrees from the University of Louisville Tuesday night.  Several family members from here attended the commencement exercises.  Dr. Dickinson will spend the month of June with his mother, Mrs. B. G. Dickinson, and on July 1 will enter the City Hospital in Louisville as an intern.

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Brown-Billingsley.  Announcement of the marriage of Miss Mary Katherine Brown, of Glasgow, and Mr. Quentin Billingsley, of 88, has been received.  The wedding was solemnized in the First Baptist Church at Elizabethtown on March 28, 1942.  Mrs. Billingsley is a 1942 graduate of Glasgow High School and Mr. Billingsley was a member of the 1941 graduating class of Temple Hill.  The young couple will make their home at 88, where he is engaged in farming.

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Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Basil, one-half mile from the Jackson Highway on the Cave City road, have donated their store building for a church.  These good people are getting old and are not able to attend church any more, and they feel that this donation will do a good work for the entire community.  The building will be used as a community home church for five denominations:  Baptist, Methodist, Presby- terian, Christian, and Hardshell Baptist.  We think the proper name for this little church in the bend of the road should be in honor of these good people and should be Basil’s Chapel as they have tried so long to donate this famous old stand for the good of the community.

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The Glasgow Rotary Club has adopted a resolution to recognize Dr. C. W. Froedge as one of the foremost figures in the establishment of the T.J. Samson Community Hospital.  It was he who called to the attention of this community the opportunity of obtaining appropriations from a Commonwealth Fund for the construction and equipping of a modern hospital.  Without assistance from this fund, Glasgow’s hospital could not have been built.  His activity in seeking a Glasgow hospital caused a monetary loss to himself and a direct reduction in his private practice.  The Rotary Club now expresses the esteem with which Dr. Froedge was and is held by his fellow citizens.

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In a list of 241 who will graduate from Western Teachers College in Bowling Green on June 5, the following are from Glasgow and vicinity:  George Conkin, Beulah Grooms, and Polly Waller Hammer, from Glasgow; C. Alexander Downing (nephew of Joe Louis, Charlie, and Will Goodman), from Horse Cave; Edna Hays, of Sulphur Lick; Nat Sartin Richardson of Waterview; and Eliza Read Crow (niece of A. F. Crow) of Scottsville.

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The O. W. Polson Grocery on West Main Street was discovered on fire about 1:00 o’clock Tuesday morning.  The conflagration seems to have started between a   meat counter and refrigerator, and it is supposed that a short circuit caused the blaze.  The entire stock of groceries and fixtures was destroyed.

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To All Americans Who Have Not Been Drafted.  Tonight when the sun goes down, it will set not only on homes but on Army Camps, Naval Stations, and defense outposts.  It will set on 1-1/2 million young men in uniform, most of them far away from home, and many of them in places remote from towns and cities.  What their lives will be like after the sun goes down depends largely on you.  These men need a club…a place where they can go for recreation and comfort in the evening…a place where they can rest and relax…and get help and advice if they want it.  To provide such a service club, six of America’s most experienced organizations have banded together to form the U.S.O. and have set up more than 500 of these clubs. The Government has supplied the buildings, but the American public has the responsibility of running them and financing them.  The cost for the first year is estimated at more than $10 million.  So, to you who have not been drafted, here is your chance to aid in national defense.  You can have a small part in making life more pleasant for those who have been drafted.  Will you join the army behind the Army?  Say yes…today!  Barren County’s quota is $3000.

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