JUNE 1933 PDF Print
Thursday, 02 May 2013 08:04

JUNE 1, 1933

Glasgow’s New Hostelry Is Thrown Open-Shut.  With no pomp, and less ceremony, Glasgow’s new hostelry, “The Quarry Inn,” was formally dedicated to public service last night when the keys were turned on five city prisoners moved from the county jail to continue their sojourns as guests of the City.  The Quarry Inn is a one-story concrete and iron building just completed by the City on the quarry site on West Front Street and will hereafter be used for incarceration of city prisoners in lieu of the county jail.  The building is equipped with water, toilets, shower baths, and electric lights.  Two steel cages are provided – one for gents and the other, presumably, for women. City officials estimate that a saving in excess of $100 per month will result from the construction of this building.

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Whale Exhibit Is Attracting Crowds.  The 68-ton captive whale which is being  exhibited from a special railway car at the depot yesterday and today is attracting large crowds and has proven to be a source of much interest to those who have visited the exhibit.  A nominal fee of  ten cents is charged per visitor, and a capable group of attendants answer a barrage of questions from an inquisitive audience.

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Two Glasgow Boys Receive CCC Ranks. Two recent Glasgow recruits to the Civilian Conservation Corps received hasty promotions  upon arrival at Fort Knox.

Ralph Hammer was made 1st Sgt. of Company 554 and James O. Nelson, 1st Duty Sgt. in the same organization.  Another local youth, Sam Chambers, a former member of the Cavalry Band, was promoted to Corporal.  Both Hammer and Nelson were former members of the Headquarters Troop 123rd, and their training with that organization no doubt contributed to their hasty promotions in their new work.

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Mr. Robert Morrison has resigned his position as assistant manager of the Spotswood Hotel and today takes up his duties as a partner in the City Dry Cleaners establishment, having bought the interest of Joe Simmons.  He will be associated with Ton Nunn in conducting the business.

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Mrs. Chrystal Huffman had the misfortune to sew through a finger last week at the Overall Factory, the needle breaking off and leaving a part in her finger; however, after a few days the piece was removed and the injured hand is improving.

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JUNE 8, 1933

Unique Service Station at Highway Intersection.   Frank Redford, of Horse Cave, is constructing a unique service station layout at the intersection of the Horse Cave-Jackson Highway roads and expects to be in operation at an early date.  The buildings, modeled as Indian wigwams, but constructed with timber and finished with stucco, will include a main building, rest rooms, and tourist rooms, all wigwam style.  In addition to the regular line of gas, oil and tires, the plant will be equipped with a restaurant and soda fountain.

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Visit Camp Mammoth Cave.  Captain and Mrs. Albert E. Ely, of Glasgow, were visitors at the new Forestry Camp near Mammoth Cave last Sunday.  Captain Ely is a member of the Mammoth Cave National Park Association.

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Court Approves Legion Plan for Memorial.  The Fiscal Court has approved the proposal made by the Barren County Post of the American Legion to place a memorial in the northwest corner of the Courthouse Yard.  The memorial will be dedicated to the Barren County boys who gave their lives during the World War, and it is expected to be completed in time for dedication on Armistice Day.

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A Cry for Help.  The Negro section of Tompkinsville was practically wiped out during a recent storm which swept that part of town; only three houses were left standing and two of these were partially unroofed.  The Red Cross will help to rebuild, and the white people of Tompkinsville are graciously assisting our people, but there is no money to rebuild their church.  We are asking 700 persons to give $1.00 each toward a fund to rebuild this Negro Methodist Church.  No  better  home missionary work than this can be done.  I want to personally thank Mrs. C.C. Turner and Mrs. Willard Greer, as well as Glasgow and Barren County, for their gracious donations and brotherly love for our destitute people.  Also, thanks to the doctors and nurses who quickly responded and ministered to the wounded and dying.  May God bless you all.  (Signed) W. E. Thomas.

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Here’s An Irresistible Sale of Adorable SILK DRESSES.   What a grand chance to round out your summer wardrobe with several flattering new frocks at so small a cost that your pocketbook will hardly miss it.  All of this season’s cleverest styles and materials are included in this thrilling offer of all silk frocks.  You’ll find quaint bodices, epaulette shoulders, puffed sleeves, pleated jabots,  and other details.  We made them in two groups:  the first group, each dress at $2.95 or two for $5.00; the second group, each dress at $4.95 or two for $9.00.  Folks Economy Store.  “Where Prices Are Reasonable.”

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JUNE 15, 1933

Miss Olene Herrod, niece of Mrs. J.D. Walbert, is nursing a badly bruised arm, the result of getting it caught in a clothes wringer.  The washing machine and wringer were attached to a gasoline engine, and the little girl’s arm, caught between the rollers and the wringer, was bruised up to the elbow.  Hearing her screams, Mrs. Walbert rushed to release the wringer, but the little girl had thrown the wringer into reverse, and the hand was rolled out.  No bad effects are expected to result from the injury.

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Barren County Rural Schools Open July 10.  For several years, the rural schools of Kentucky have been seven-months schools, but this year they will be only six-months schools.  They will begin on July 10 in order to be dismissed by Christmas. The opening times for high schools will be announced later.

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Close Call for Mrs. Ike Wilkinson.  Last Sunday afternoon during an electrical storm in the Temple Hill country, lightning played a trick on Mrs. Ike Wilkinson when it entered the house and set fire to the bed on which she was resting.  She was not shocked so badly as to render her helpless and, upon jumping up, she smelled fire, saw the bed covers burning, and was able to put out the fire.  It was then found that lightning had knocked the house off the foundation stones.  It was a close call but, thanks be, it was not worse.

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Teachers Named for Barren County Rural Schools.   Teachers of some of the rural schools in the area of Glasgow are:  Allen School – Mae Dillingham;  Beckton – Edith Bertram;  Beech Grove – Paul Allen; Coral Hill – Mary Eubank;  Eighty-Eight – James Depp;  Etoile – Marjorie Flowers;  Forrest Seminary – Frank Taylor;

 

JUNE 15, 1933

Haywood – Robert Miller;  Little Hope – Louise Ferguson;  Merry Oaks – A.T. McCoy;  Mt. Ayr – Oren Doyle;  Rocky Hill – Nettie Ethel Goff;  Walnut Hill – Austeel Pennycuff.

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W. U. Messenger Injured.  Paul Duvall, Western Union messenger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Duvall, has been confined to his home for several days as the result of injuries received on his bicycle, but he is now able to be back on duty.

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JUNE 22, 1933

New Legal Light.  Glasgow’s distinguished bar was graced by the addition of a new member Monday night when John Evans Richardson Jr. joined the firm of which his father is the senior member, and we assume that the firm will now become Richardson, Redford, and Richardson, Attorneys-at-Law. Incidentally, the middle member of this firm is expected to return this week from Virginia Beach, thus concluding the bridal tour of Carroll Morris Redford and his charming bride, the former Miss Florence Smither, whose return is being keenly anticipated by their many friends.

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Six Have Narrow Escape.  Six local youths had a narrow escape from serious injury yesterday morning while working around the debris of the Davidson Warehouse fire.  A barrel of disinfectant exploded and threw hot liquid over some

of them, and hurled two of them about 25 feet.  Harry Cook was painfully burned about his back, neck and arms; Ray Hurt, arms and ears burned;  Bill Reagan, arms burned; Gates Traylor, Garland Reynolds, and Herbert Taylor, shocked and slightly burned.

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JUNE 29, 1933

State Granted Free Ferry at Burkesville.  Sometime ago the State Highway Commission established a free ferry at Burkesville because they did not have the funds to build a bridge but wanted to give the public free travel over U.S. Highway 80 by Glasgow, Burkesville, Albany, and on.  Owners of an existing private ferry brought suit to enjoin the State from establishing a competing ferry, and won their case in Frankfort; however, the Commonwealth then appealed the matter to the Court of Appeals and, last week, won the appeal.  This means that the State will establish a free ferry until such time as funds are available to build a bridge, which will also be free to the public.

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“Have You Picked Your Girl?”  Tonight at the Armory, a “ pound dance” will be held, with Roy Holmes and his orchestra supplying the music.  But be very careful of your girl, for you must pay one cent for each pound of her weight.  But for bru- nettes, there is a rebate of 10%; for blondes, 20%; for red-heads, 30%.  We predict this will make “skinny” girls much in demand. The heaviest girl and the lightest girl need no ticket, but if you have no girl, just take along one big dollar.

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On July 1, local letter postage will be reduced from three cents to two cents.  This applies only to drop letter postage, that is, it does not apply from one post office to another.  Locally, it applies to letters dropped in the Glasgow post office addressed to persons receiving their mail at Glasgow, including the seven rural routes.  But this reduction in price does apply to all other county post offices.

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WCLU Weather

28°
-2°
°F | °C
Fair
Humidity: 82%
Wed
Mostly Cloudy
29 | 40
-1 | 4
Thu
Cloudy
29 | 39
-1 | 3