AUGUST 1933 PDF Print
Tuesday, 30 July 2013 13:12

AUGUST 3, 1933

Popular Potts & Davis Restaurant in Trade.  Mr. and Mrs. R.E. Munday have purchased the well known and popular restaurant known as the Potts & Davis Restaurant. This stand has always enjoyed a large patronage and is known over several counties, in fact, has drawn patrons from other counties.  Mr. and Mrs. Munday are not strangers here as both of them are Glasgow people. For a dozen years, they have been living in Fort Dodge, Iowa, where Mr. Munday was engaged in kindred business.  They are live, wide awake business people who will keep the reputation of this place up to its present standard.

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From Edmonton.  Lawrence Isenberg is in Louisville this week buying equipment to install a beer fountain.  He will have beer on tap about August 8th.

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AD.  “Last Chance” to purchase flour at these prices as on August 8 all flour will carry a tax of approximately 20 cents on a 24-lb. bag.   We urge you to take advantage of these savings and buy flour NOW.  These prices effective only as long as present store stocks last:  Gold Medal flour, 24-lb. bag, 93 cents or 12-lb. bag, 49 cents.  Sunnyfield  24-lb. bag, plain, 69 cents, or self-rising, 71 cents.

Also on sale, Magnolia Hams, sugar-cured, 10-14 lb. average, 13 cents per pound, bar candy or chewing gum, 3 for 10 cents; cigarettes, all popular brands, 10-pkg, $1.00 per carton.

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Austin-Tracy High School to Open August 14.  Barren County’s newest high school will open on August 14 under management of Prof. R.A. Palmore of this city and Miss Carrie Newberry of Hiseville.  Pupils of this school should do excellent work this year as they have a brand new building just completed half-way between the old Austin and Tracy buildings, and they also have two of the best teachers in Barren County as instructors.  The elementary grades of the two schools are being taught in the old building at Austin by Miss Nora Harrison, and in the old Tracy School by Mrs. W.A.Simmons and Mrs. Mara Barton Mosier.

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AUGUST 10, 1933

AD.  You’ll Never See Such Furniture Values Again!  Biggest Chance of This Generation to Buy at a Saving!  Bed, Chest, and Dresser or Vanity.  A thrilling value for the bedroom: three handsome pieces, made of walnut and gumwood with a maple overlay decoration.  Your choice of four-poster or shaped panel bed.  Now only $49.50.  Also nine pieces for the dining room for only $80.00.  We advise you to buy early while our supply lasts!  F.P.Williams Company.

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Browning School Notes.  Last week finished our first month of school, and we are well pleased with the results of our exams.  The highest average made was 98%,  Miss Mary Ann Pace having made that score.  Those making as much as an “A” average on their grade cards were James Trigg Pace, Kenneth Botts Renfro, Raymond Grizzle, Edd Spears, Mary Ann Pace, Anna B. Renfro, Helen Garret, and Dorothy Fisher.  Teacher: Jessie Houchens,

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Three Escape City Jail in Second Break. The City Jail seems to need some repairs. It is not a very attractive place in which to reside, as the windows are so high that the prisoners cannot see out except toward the sky.  Besides, it is a rather lonely place and somewhat warm in hot weather.  And so, many prisoners have been escaping one way or another.  We suggest that the City either furnish the prisoners more means of amusement, or else make the lock burglar proof.  Make it burglar proof or junk it.

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Mr. Joe Dan Squires saw his Plymouth coupe being driven from his garage early Monday night.  He had driven into the garage only a few minutes earlier and, as the key was hard to remove from the lock, he let it remain in the lock.  The thief may have known of this condition but, any way, soon after Mr. Squires went to his room, he heard a noise at the garage and looked out in time to see his car being driven out the Burkesville Road.  He immediately called Policeman Pate Walkup and, together, they drove as far as Summer Shade but, failing to overtake the car, returned home. On Wednesday morning the car was found in a thicket two miles out the Burkesville Road with more gasoline in the tank than it had when taken. But Mr. Squires still thinks he’s a loser, as the car had been driven 216 miles, the front bumper, the seat covers and the spare tire were gone, to say nothing of the license plates which are missing.

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AUGUST 17, 1933

Doyle Takes Over Walbert Truck Line.  L.B. Doyle and Sons closed a deal this week whereby they have bought out the Walbert Bros. truck line and depot, which they took possession of on Monday.  The truck line also included Walbert’s franchise for truck service from Glasgow to Louisville and will be added to Doyle’s Glasgow-Nashville line.  Doyle’s truck depot will be under the super- vision of Mrs. Joe Lewis Bethel.

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Treated by Mad Stone.  Herbert Goodman, Munfordville, was treated yesterday with the Mad Stone belonging to Mrs. Lucian Peers, who lives on the Edmonton Road just east of Lecta.  The stone has been in the possession of Mrs. Peers’ family for generations, during which time it has been applied to more than 600 persons. An uncle of Mr. Goodman was treated by the stone more than thirty years ago.  The stone is kept in a safety box in a local bank as it is considered very valuable.

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Kitchen at Methodist Church Nears Completion. The kitchen, an addition to the Methodist Church, is nearing completion and will be finished within the next few days.  The new addition had been desired for some time, and hosting the annual conference in September made it necessary to complete the arrangements for entertaining visiting clergy.

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The new duplex building adjoining the home of Mrs. B.G. Dickinson on West Washington Street is nearing completion and at that time will be occupied by her sons, Messrs. Brents Jr and Rogers Dickinson and their families.

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Local Youths Will Cavort at Early Morning Frolic.  The latest event offered to local society is an “Early Morning Frolic” advertised for the Hillcrest Country Club, beginning at 12:01 a.m. Monday.  The event will be “musiced” by the Roy Holmes Orchestra, featuring Bill Bushong, a Monroe County youth who created somewhat of a sensation as a soloist with the Blue and White Orchestra while attending school at the University of Kentucky.  He was heard frequently through WHAS and has a most pleasing voice for the radio.

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Shakespearean Club to Stage Pageant.  The Joy Making and Mary Arden Shakespeare Clubs, under the direction of Miss Jane Williams, will present a pageant on the lawn of Miss Williams’ home on Friday afternoon, August 18, at 4:00 o’clock.  The entire pageant will be given in full costume and more than forty children will be included in the cast.  The feature of the program will be a presentation of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”  A small admission fee will be charged, and the public is invited.

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Men working on State roads must wear at least shirts and trousers, Chairman Ben  Johnson said in a letter to the District Engineer whose headquarters are in Louisville.  Highway workers, in many instances, have been in the habit of working nude down to the waist.  If any of the employees persist in the habit of such “vulgar immodesty,” they should be released from service, Johnson said.

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AUGUST 24, 1933

Local Boys Win Free Trip to World’s Fair.  W.J. and Frank McDaniel, sons of Mr. and Mrs. C.W. McDaniel, have won a free trip to the World’s Fair in Chicago.  The boys are local carriers for the Herald Post in Louisville, who is sponsoring the trip.

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Eugene Wooten was sworn in yesterday as Constable in the First Magisterial District.  Mr. Wooten assumed his new duties Wednesday and will serve until his successor is elected and qualified.

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“Buy-A-Pair-of-Pants” Week.  Glasgowians as well as other Barren Countians will have the opportunity to demonstrate the “home town” spirit when local merchants will conduct “Buy-A-Pair-of-Pants” week.  This movement is deserving of general cooperation since the Washington Manufacturing plant has been Glasgow’s largest payroll for many months and much of the prosperity of the entire community depends upon the plant’s continued success.  Hundreds have been furnished employment, and every cent of money has been spent locally.  What is good enough to be made in Glasgow should be good enough to be worn by Glasgowians. And speaking from experience, we know that you will be delightfully pleased with this product.

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Bowling Alley to Open.  Mr. G.C. Irwin, of Elizabethtown, was in Glasgow yesterday completing arrangements for the opening of his bowling alley about September 1.

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J.D. Elmore was given a life sentence in the penitentiary last Thursday by a jury in the Monroe Circuit Court for the killing of Gilbert Hood, who was brutally assassinated at his home about four months ago. Elmore’s conviction followed shortly on the heels of a similar sentence inflicted last Wednesday on Hood’s widow, Irlie Hood, for conspiracy in the assassination.  It was contended by the Commonwealth that the two had killed Hood in order to get the $3000 life insurance which he carried.  A prompt solution of the gruesome assassination is attributable to the splendid work of Sheriff Evans and County Attorney Paul Carter, who took Elmore into custody within a few hours of the killing and connected a chain of circumstances which shocked the entire community and led to speedy confessions and subsequent convictions.

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AUGUST 31, 1933

Scarlet fever is reported from the Oak Grove school, and suspicious cases that may prove to be this disease are reported from other schools of the county.  The County Health Department has been advised of the situation, and prompt steps will be taken to prevent the spread of this disease.

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Brick Company Dissolving.  Notice has been filed for dissolution of the Glasgow Brick Company who constructed and operated a plant on the South Jackson Highway just below the Cavalry Field.

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WCLU Weather

65°
18°
°F | °C
Fair
Humidity: 74%
Wed
Clear
58 | 84
14 | 28
Thu
Mostly Sunny
67 | 88
19 | 31