March 1930 PDF Print
Tuesday, 13 April 2010 05:51

March 6, 1930

City’s Population Shows Big Increase.  Last week the City Council passed an ordinance taking into the corporate limits most of the population which have lived just outside the corporate limits and have enjoyed the benefits of modern conveniences without being counted as in town.  Heretofore the limits of Glasgow have extended just one-half mile from the court house except for a narrow strip on each side of Race  Street.  This has been greatly to the disadvantage of Glasgow in that, according to the census, Glasgow was rated as a town of 2500 population.  There is no way of estimating the population this extension will add to Glasgow but the census will be taken next month and then the facts will be found out.
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C. W. and Paul Piper, brothers, have established a grist mill one-half mile east of Beckton, where they grind corn and are trying to establish a profitable trade in meal.  We trust they may succeed.
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Mr. Andy Bryant and Miss Sallie Perkins, both of Hiseville, hied themselves to Bowling Green last week and were joined in wedlock by Rev. J. L. Piercey at his residence.  These are among the finest young people in Hiseville and their host of friends wish them the greatest happiness.
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AD:  “Allwear Brand” – Made in Glasgow’s Overall Factory by Glasgow and Barren County operators and sold by the following home town merchants:  Davis and Eubank; Smoot Bros.; Red Front Store; H. W. Jolly and Sons; Vaughan-Warder Company; Folks Economy Store.  When you buy work clothing manufactured by Washington Manufacturing Company, you are increasing the payroll of Glasgow’s Overall Factory.  Overalls for men as well as boys!
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Master Woods Barlow, seven-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Barlow, suffered a broken arm in a fall Monday but will soon be on the road to recovery.
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MARCH 13, 1930

Joe Duff Is Dead.  “Uncle Joe” Duff is no more.  He was a negro man but a very unusual one.  He had done his “bit,” and it was a considerable sized “bit.”  He was 80 years old and those years had been filled with good deeds.  He had been a Union soldier through the entire Civil War.  He was a faithful soldier, as he was faithful in every thing he undertook to do.  One incident in his military career is notable as General Grant once obeyed his orders.  “Uncle Joe” was on picket duty one rainy night when he heard a horse approaching.  He called out, “Who comes there?” and the answer was “General Grant.”  Quick as lightning came the order, “General Grant, dismount and give the countersign.”  And the reply came back, “But I am the commanding general.”  Again “Uncle Joe” ordered, “General Grant, dismount and give the countersign” and down General Grant dismounted in the mud and congratulated the negro for his faithfulness to duty.  “Uncle Joe” was a trained soldier and he knew that anyone could come along and say he was General Grant, but he also knew that no one passed him without dismounting and giving the countersign, as that was his orders.
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From Persimmon:  The evening guests of Mr. T. G. Ferguson and family were Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Birch, Miss Mayme Strode, Herman Holloway, Glenn Dubree and Fred, Hascal and Med Chapman.  They were entertained with the victrola and two guitars played by Fred Chapman and Herman Holloway.
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Child Suffers Broken Leg.  Marvel, six-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Acy Wood, near Mt. Hermon, suffered a broken leg last Thursday.  He and his older brother Gilbert, aged seven, were with their father who was engaged in burning a plant bed.  Gilbert secured an ax and cut down a small tree that fell across Marvel’s left leg, snapping the bone just above the ankle.  The child was rushed here for medical aid.
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Monday evening Messrs. Willie Francis and Jake Kinslow picked up new 10-gallon kegs in South Fork Creek, just below the ford at the ice plant.  The kegs had just been emptied of whiskey of the bootleg variety as the smell was still  rank.  Evidently some bootleggers had disposed of the liquor to some fools, and then discarded the kegs.  There seems to be little or no effort made here to detect the guilty parties.
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Oakland Robber Captured.  Richard McNeese, accused of the recent killing of Smiths Grove bank president Mr. Robert Kirby, has been captured in Chicago.  McNeese and another robber undertook to steal the car of Policeman Herman Myers and to kidnap him.   McNeese was in civilian clothes and was seated in his parked car.  Unaware of whom they were kidnapping, one drove the car while the other held a gun on the policeman, who suddenly whipped out his pistol and shot McNeese twice, fatally wounding him.  Identified by a photograph and fingerprints, McNeese was said to be one of the Oakland robbers.  The other fellow is being held for identification.  If these prove to be the wanted pair, this completes the round-up of the bank robbers and speedy justice will be done.

MARCH 20, 1930

AD: There will be an airplane at the Glasgow Fair Grounds on Saturday and Sunday to carry passengers on cross country and pleasure trips.  A good ship and a safe pilot.  Come and bring the family; take them for a ride in the clouds and see what Mother Earth looks like from the air.  [Signed by] L. C. “Lap” Ewing.
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New Hotel for Mammoth Cave.  A contract has been let to Jenkins and Company, Elizabethtown, for construction of a modern hotel building at Mammoth Cave.  Work on the new building will be started immediately, and it is expected the new building will be completed this year.
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In the good old days, all a statesman had to have to get by was a pocketful of nickel cigars.  Now he has to have a voice that sounds good over the radio.
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Quite a number of Glasgowians took a trip through the “New Entrance Cave” Sunday afternoon and found the trip a most enjoyable one.  There are two entrances to this wonderful “hole in the ground,” and we went in at the old entrance in Edmonson County and came out at another entrance some three miles away in Barren County.  The scenery simply beggars description and the “Frozen Niagara” is said to be the most beautiful and interesting room in any cave on earth.  Its beauty is dazzling to the eye, and a wonder to geologists.  Our unit was fortunate in having the company of Mr. John M. Nelson, who knows more about caves in Edmonson County than any other man.
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From East Glasgow.  Miss Edna Ruth Matthews visited Miss Lucy Byrd Oliver Saturday night. -----  Miss Christine Delk visited Miss Marie Ford one day last week. -----Miss Mae Cawthorn bought a new radio.  [Signed by] “Lonesome Kid.”
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MARCH 27, 1930

Smallpox Seems Past.  Mr. Robert Morrison, like the last rose of summer, seems to have closed out the smallpox epidemic.  He is out again and, while he feels good,
MARCH 27, 1930

he says he doesn’t want any more.  If there is another case in the county, we have not heard of it.
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The idea of establishing an aviation field in Glasgow was discussed in a recent meeting with the Chamber of commerce and the owners of the local fairground.  Mr. Kincannon of Louisville, an experienced aviator, was present at the meeting and was very complimentary of the fairgrounds and of the strategic location of Glasgow.  He predicted that we could have one of the finest fields in the state, claiming that we have a finer location than either Nashville or Lexington.  If our people fail to take advantage of this opportunity, it will be a great mistake – in fact, a fatal mistake.
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AD:  General Blacksmithing.  “Try the Best First.”  Wagon and Carriage Repairing.  Horse Shoeing and Rubber Tiring Our Specialty.  W. F.Neely, Proprietor.  South Race Street, near Postoffice, Glasgow, Kentucky.
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The Louisville and Nashville Railroad was 80 years old on March 5, 1930.


The road first saw the light of day in Frankfort on March 5, 1850.  Initial capital stock was $3,000,000, of which the first million was subscribed by the city of Louisville, being followed by various subscriptions from counties in Southern Kentucky and Tennessee.  Now the capital stock is $117,000,000. Construction of the L & N began with a 185-mile line from Louisville to Nashville which was opened for traffic on November 1, 1859.  Today it owns or controls over 8,000 miles of road serving fourteen states of the Central South.
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Gipsy Simon Smith Meeting.  The meeting of the Presbyterian Church, conducted in the courthouse by Rev. Gipsy Simon Smith for two weeks, closed Sunday night.
Large crowds overflowed the Circuit Court room where the meeting was held, and many were turned away for want of room.  Mr. Smith was born in a gypsy wagon in England and has wandered over a large part of the world, having crossed the ocean 43 times.  He speaks in a mild tone and appeals to the higher attributes of heart and intellect of his hearers. His preaching did not create antagonism among the churches, but had a good effect on his hearers, who were admonished to a better life.  As to the number added to the church, we are not informed, but his preaching was complimented all around.  If he should ever return to Glasgow, he will receive a warm welcome.


Marriage Licenses:  Charlie Owen and Sophie Martin;  John Elmer Garner and Iva May Slone;  LeRoy J. Neumeister and Mary E. Redford.
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Questions for Census Listed.  The list of questions to be asked by enumerators in the 1930 population survey has been announced.  A number of new questions, among them questions relating to home ownership and rental, radio ownership, occupation and marriage, are included in the list.  Among the most important of the new questions is that calling for the value of the home if owned, or the monthly rental if rented.  This information will be kept secret, but will make possible a classification of families according to economic status or “buying power.” 
Mr. Bishop Huntsman of Bowling Green, Supervisor of the Census for the Third District, was here yesterday afternoon lecturing the enumerators for Barren and Metcalfe counties.
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Judge J. M. Jackson, former County Judge of Monroe County and for 25 years a practicing attorney in Tompkinsville, is arranging to leave his native city abut May 1 and make his home with his daughter in Jefferson County, where he owns a farm.  It is said that Judge Jackson’s hearing is greatly impaired, which makes the practice of law very inconvenient.  He is one of the best citizens of Monroe County and his leaving will cause a vacancy which will be hard to fill.  We regret the necessity of his giving up his practice, as well as the necessity of his leaving this part of Kentucky.
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