May 1930 PDF Print
Thursday, 10 June 2010 06:48

MAY 1, 1930


Scottsville had a very destructive fire at 2:30 yesterday morning, in which the southeast corner of the court house square was burned, entailing a loss of perhaps $60,000.  The businesses burned out were the Great A&P Tea Company, the City Market, Grand Café, Haynes Grocery, Judge Harper’s office and County Attorney Keen’s office.

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Glasgow A Mecca for the Medical Profession.  Dr. C. G. Follis, who has been House Physician at Community Hospital since its opening, will resign soon and settle down to the practice of medicine and surgery in Glasgow.  Dr. George M. Wells, who practiced here before the World War and then practiced as a surgeon in France, has decided Glasgow is the best place in the country and is returning here to take up permanent residence and settle down to practice medicine here as long as he lives.  After an absence of three years, Dr. L.E. Loftus has returned and opened an office for the practice of medicine.  Before going into public health work, he practiced medicine in Glasgow for several years and became quite popular.  Everyone welcomes him back.

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Captain A. E. Ely of this place has been appointed a member of the Mammoth Cave National Park Commission to fill a vacancy caused by the failure of Mr. Ed Winter of Owensboro to qualify on account of business connections which made it impossible for him to serve.  Governor Sampson made the appointment yesterday afternoon.  Up to this time, no county in which any part of the Park was covered, has had any recognition, and Captain Ely’s appointment recognizes Barren, Hart, and Edmonson counties, in which all the National Park is situated.

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All cases involving the annexation of territory to the City of Glasgow will be tried at a special term of Circuit court in June, by agreement of both sides.  Judge Richardson is disqualified, and a special judge will be appointed by the Chief Justice of Kentucky.

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AD.  The Old Planing Mill.  FLY SCREENS.  Have your fly screens made now before the flies come.  Call on us; we make your screens to order.

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NOTE TO HENRY:  The Glasgow Republican issues for May 8 and May 22 are missing; therefore, articles for these two weeks were taken from The Daily News which, as the name indicates, was published each day.  Each issue consisted of  four 10” x 15” pages,  four columns per page.


MAY 8, 1930


School Children Visit Cave EnMasse.  With a zeal that would have done credit to the Pied Piper of Hamelin, the school children answered the invitation to visit New Entrance Mammoth Cave by forming a caveward bound caravan in the early hours this morning.  Over 400 children were in the party.  In addition to the private vehicles which transported them, four large trucks were loaded to capacity.  Their hilarious shouting was wafted back long after they had faded from view.

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The Schubert Quartet, Mrs. Bryant, Mrs. Rapp, Mrs. Trigg and Miss Eleanor Trigg, will present a program of chamber music before the Horse Cave Music Club this afternoon at 3:30.

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Mr. and Mrs. Buford Wood announce the arrival of an 11-1/2 pound girl this morning.  The young lady’s name is Sarah Bailey.

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A boating party turned slightly damp last evening when the row boat in which “Dude” and Floyd Holmes and two girls were riding was upset in Skagg’s Creek.  All four of the occupants took an unexpected icy dip in five feet of water when the boat overturned.  Neither of the girls could swim and were carried ashore by the captains of the boat.  The worst part of the adventure, according to the survivors, was when the cool evening breezes commenced to whistle through their wet, clammy garments en route home.

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Jailer Lee Woodcock has removed the fences from around the grass in the Court House yard.  Lee has a nice stand of grass in the yard now and the removal of the fences does not mean that the yard is open for trespassing and lounging.

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MAY 15, 1930


At Scottsville last night about 6:00 o’clock, Miss Virgie May Walker, a sophomore in the high school at that place. Lost control of the car she was driving and rammed the residence of Esquire Joseph W. Huntsman with such force that it knocked a bed 
about four feet out into the room.  Mr. and Mrs. Huntsman were at supper and received quite a shock.  Luckily, no one was seriously injured.

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Sergeant B. C. Craft of Indianapolis, a member of the regular U.S. Army and an instructor of the Signal Corps, is spending a week here to take our Cavalry Boys through a course in signaling, a very important part of a soldier’s training.  In June he will return for another session, preparatory to summer camp at Knox in July.

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Another step in the raid on liquor violation laws was made Saturday when Deputy U.S. Marshall Claire Wade and two Prohibition Enforcement Officers came to town and, with the help of Sheriff Barlow, arrested four men accused of selling liquor, and escorted them to Bowling Green.  Part of the liquor taken was poured out in the street here, and part was taken to Bowling Green as evidence.

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Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Honeycutt and son, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Payne and son, and Mrs. Will Payne were in Franklin Sunday afternoon. ----- Miss Elizabeth Harvey of  Louisville spent the week end with her parents and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Harvey and Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Harvey.

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In Circuit Court Saturday, the value of the original Mammoth Cave property was set by a jury at $700,000 in condemnation proceedings.  As the Park Body already owns two-thirds of the property, only one-third will have to be paid when the entire estate will pass into the hands of the Association.  This is a great step toward acquiring the entire 70,000 acres needed.

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MAY 22, 1930


Mrs. A. Rapp died at her home on East Main Street today following a lingering illness.  Mrs. Rapp was a splendid Christian character beloved by all with whom she came in contact.  She was a devout member of the Baptist Church.  Three children survive:  K. E. Rapp Sr., Miss Lallah Rapp, and Mrs. Nettie Owsley, all of Glasgow.

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Mr. P. W. Holman received a letter yesterday that came all the way from Buenos Aires, Argentina by air mail.  This air service was inaugurated but recently, and  this letter was one of the first to come over it.  The letter was delivered here within ten days where heretofore, it would have taken at least thirty days.

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Mr. H. C. Reynolds was fined $5.00 and costs this morning for permitting cattle to run at large.

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The Derby edition of the Kentucky Progress Magazine contains the proclamation of Governor Sampson which sets aside Derby Day as a legal holiday in every section of Kentucky “as  a holiday and a day on which all Kentucky may serve as a reception committee to their distinguished visitor, the Earl of Derby, and do honor and bid a true Kentucky welcome to Kentucky’s guests on this gala occasion so dear to the hearts of all admirers of King Thoroughbred.”

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Fall from Horse Fatal to Will Bishop.  Will Bishop died this morning at the Samson Hospital from injuries sustained from being thrown from his horse about a mile and a half from his home near Rocky Hill.  Mr. Bishop was thrown from his horse late Friday and his hip broken.  He was unable to move and was not found until Saturday morning.  He was then taken to the Samson Hospital where he died this morning.  He is survived by three sisters.  He was not married.  Funeral services will be held at the home three miles from Rocky Hill tomorrow afternoon.  He was the son of Mrs. Nan Bishop.

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MAY 29, 1930


Proclamation.  In order that all may have an opportunity to attend Memorial Day services and pay that tribute of love and affection so justly due our loved ones, it is earnestly requested that all places of business in Glasgow close from 10:00 until 12 noon on Friday, May 30th, that we may attend these services.  [Signed] J. E. Clayton, Mayor.

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Governor Sampson, accompanied by Adjutant General W. H. Jones Jr, was in the western part of the state Tuesday on official business and took the opportunity to visit Glasgow and inspect the new airport.  He expressed himself as being highly  
impressed with the new airport and especially with its nearness to the main part of the city.  When completed, Glasgow’s airport will rank second to Louisville.

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William Hurson Eckles, Thomas Henry Kinney, Joe Thomas Smith and Thomas Arlene Boston, all from Horse Cave Graded School and High School, have been accepted as Cadets CMTC, Camp Knox, Kentucky for the 30-day instruction period.  These ambitious and deserving boys will be greatly benefited by contact with the ablest instructors and workers who endeavor to start boys on the correct road to make real men.

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The Allen County Fiscal Court has awarded a contract for construction of a 182-foot bridge across Barren River at Brownsford.  The bridge will cost Allen County $2206.00 and must be completed and open to traffic by October 16.  If excess days are required, a penalty of $25 for each excess working day will be charged to the construction company.

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Mrs. Charles T. Renfro entertained with a miscellaneous shower for Miss Elizabeth Claire Curd, whose marriage to Mr. Bernard A. Hunger of Knoxville takes place Saturday.  An altar was erected on the lawn, and under this altar the bride-to-be opened the many lovely gifts brought by her friends.  One beautiful feature of the occasion was the music by Master Albert Henry Shirley, Master “Billy” Vaughn, and little Miss “Coogie” Vaughn.

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Commencement Exercises at Glasgow Auditorium last Thursday evening marked the closing of Glasgow Public School for the session 1929-30.  Professor Ridley presented 5 young men and women their diplomas of graduation from Glasgow High School.  An honor reward went to Jessie Houchens for highest grade average and she was presented five dollars in gold; Kate Dickinson was honored for excellence in scholarship and loyalty, and was also honored for superior excellence in Latin.

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“N.T., the little five-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Eulan Bradshaw, fell from the low limb of a fruit tree Sunday and broke one arm.  But that will not keep “Little Red” down long, and he will soon be ready to climb some more.

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